Published by Viking in November 1998
Penguin paperback, in January 2000

LIFT: Wanting, Fearing - and Having - a Face-Lift

Not Just Another Book About Someone's Face-Lift. Informative, Gossipy, Thought-Provoking and a Good Read.

by Joan Kron

Hardcover: ISBN 0-670-87060-9
264 pages; U.S. $23.95
Paperback: ISBN 0-14-027803-6
272 pages; U.S.$13.95


About LIFT

About the author

LIFT Table of Contents

Read an excerpt from LIFT

Reviews of LIFT

Order LIFT from Amazon.com



Send e-mail to the author: joankron@facelift.com





Face it. For many of us, the hardest thing to confess is that we care enough about our appearance to go under the knife. Joan Kron understands. Until she saw a stranger in the mirror, she never thought she would have a face-lift. But she did.

Kron is the most respected journalist in the field of cosmetic surgery today, and she is the perfect guide through the deliberation process: the identity crisis suffered when your face no longer fits your self-image; issues of vanity (and economics); and the myriad questions. How do you identify appropriate doctors? Should your procedure be done in a hospital or office? Are celebrity surgeons better or worse? What about the new techniques written up each day in magazines? What are the danger zones they don't tell you about? How do you tell your mother-in-law?

Kron uses dozens of real cases, interviews with doctors and nurses, historical information, and years of frontline reporting to make sure you have the whole story. Most important, Kron teaches you the difference between taking care of yourself and taking stupid risks. She will arm you with all the right sources, questions, and approaches so that you can safely navigate around the mystery, the hype, the gossip, and the old wives' tales about face-lifts.

Wanting a face-lift is between you and your mirror. Opting for one is a personal decision often fraught with guilt an embarrassment, which stop too many people from seeking the right advice. LIFT isn't just for those who are having a face-lift. If you have ever contemplated one, you need to read this book.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Joan Kron is an award-winning journalist who has covered plastic surgery for Allure magazine for the last seventeen years. She has been a staff reporter for the New York Times, New York magazine, and the Wall Street Journal. Her previous books include Home-Psych and High-Tech.

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AN EXCERPT FROM "LIFT"

CHAPTER ONE: "HOW I GOT THIS FACE":

I am older than Gloria Steinem and younger than Helen Gurley Brown. Until recently, when cameras became my enemy, I was certain I would never do it -- have a face-lift, that is.

Like many women, I defused my feelings about aging by alternately joking about plastic surgery and condemning it. Deep down, though, everything about this rite of passage fascinated me -- surgeon-shamans, secret-society membership, the scarification ceremony, cult of bravery, period of social withdrawal, and dramatic reentry with a younger visage.

But after visiting a pretty-in-pink cosmetic-surgery recovery house in Beverly Hills while on assignment in 1991, and seeing one after another bruised, swollen-faced, tranquilized women, I turned to the photographer working with me, rolled my eyes, and vowed, 'Not me, ever.' Two years later, I am in New York's premiere plastic surgery facility, as a patient.

How do I explain this about-face?

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TABLE OF CONTENTS OF "LIFT"

Before
1. HOW I GOT THIS FACE
2. IT'S NOT NICE TO FOOL MOTHER NATURE
3. LOSING FACE
4. FINDING DR. RIGHT

During
5. LIFE AND DEATH DETAILS

6. ANATOMY OF A FACE-LIFT

7. PRESSING OUT THE WRINKLES

After
8. PARDON MY APPEARANCE; I'VE JUST HAD A RUN-IN WITH A PLASTIC SURGEON
9. METAMORPHOSIS--THE BUTTERFLY EMERGES
10. IT'S YOUR DECISION

Check it Out
Acknowledgements
Notes
Index

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REVIEWS OF "LIFT"

From the New York Times, November 15, 1998, Section 14, page 1: "WITTY, INFORMATIVE, SMARTLY WRITTEN AND UNFLINCHING IN ITS DETAILS..." -- Robert Lipsyte

From the Los Angeles Times, Wednesday December 9, 1998: "We couldn't put this book down ... Who knew that a book about plastic surgery could be a page-turner? Kron provides information useful for those considering plastic surgery, not to mention the dish on how some stars got those great looks. [Says Kron,] even Marilyn Monroe [had] a little help from her doctors. A chin implant kicked off Monroe's career ... and the funny Fanny Brice had a nose job at 31 ... The book also has ... a blow-by-blow description of Kron's second face-lift of two, debates about techniques and anesthesia, sources for checking credentials."

From the East Hampton Star, April 8, 1999, by Anne Hazard Aldrich: "For the many women and men who feel that cosmetic surgery will make them happier and old age less onerous, Joan Kron's new book "Lift" offers important guidelines....Face-lifting would not be my choice, but, if it were, this book certainly is the one to read....Chapter six...is a kind of litmus test of whether one could face cosmetic surgery or not. My feeling was definitely not, but I am a coward....The reader is informed of various types of incisions, the scarring factor, and, finally, aftercare....Ms. Kron deals with ways in which the 'wind-tunnel' effect can be, hopefully, avoided and some other classic pitfalls of cosmetic surgery. [She points out that]'the latest line-tamer' for frown lines between the eyes is Botox, better known as BTX, or botulinum toxin, which until the 1970s was a quick, cheap weapon of mass destruction....She discusses peeling, which is more of a procedure than I had imagined, and laser surgery....[She] gives the reader a short biography of one of the first and surely major figures in 20th-century plastic surgery, the well known (for his sporting jet-set life as much as for his medical track record) Dr. Ivo Pitanguy. Ms. Kron obviously knows of what she writes and she does not paint in any pink clouds in spite of being an enthusiastic face-lift 'survivor'....Since she has spent the past seven years covering plastic surgery for Allure magazine and having two face-lifts of her own, she is certainly qualified to write [this book.]"

From Publishers Weekly, October 5, 1998: "HIGHLY INFORMATIVE...SOUND PRACTICAL ADVICE...COMPELLINGLY [WRITTEN]."

"Kron has written a highly informative guide for men and women considering whether to 'prune the tree -- stop the skin, fat, and muscle from heading south'....Kron offers sound practical advice on how to find 'Dr. Right,' choose types of anesthetic and navigate the hospital, as well as emotional guidance on how to decide if one is really ready for a lift, dealing with disapproving family and friends and coping with the post-op carnage. She paints a full picture, incorporating a limited historical and sociological overview of aesthetic surgery, interviews with noted plastic surgeons, sociological studies and, most compellingly, her own experiences under the knife."

From Library Journal, October 5, 1998: "FORMIDABLE RESEARCH...HIGHLY RECOMMENDED"

"This title follows an author who's been through the process of finding a doctor, deciding what to have done, the surgery itself, and recuperation. Kron goes further than [other recent books] in discussing the history of plastic surgery, outlining the methodology of various procedures, and providing a directory of accreditation agencies. A journalist who covers plastic surgery for Allure magazine, Kron underwent two surgeries herself, and her experiences, buttressed by formidable research, make this book essential for libraries needing material on the subject. Highly recommended."

From People Magazine "Q & A," December 21, 1998: "'Once upon a time, author Joan Kron hated the idea of a face-lift. Ah the arrogance of youth. Now she's had two' ... Cosmetic surgery isn't about vanity, Kron believes. 'It's an act of refusal to look older than you feel. Focusing on appearance can be fun if it's not the only focus in your life.'"

From Form & Figure Magazine, Winter 1999: "A candid, firsthand dissection of ... well, let's rephrase that, a firsthand account of her facelift ... a fact-filled look at plastic surgery as it is currently practiced ... provides historical perspective on the pursuit of beauty from Cleopatra to Cher ... Kron's tome is an entertaining, valuable resource for those seriously, or just vicariously, considering a little lift."

From TV Guide Entertainment Network, Daily Dish, December 2, 1998, "Plastic Surgery Secrets of the Stars," by Maitland McDonagh:

"Witty and passionately researched ... mixes history, a cut-by-cut account of her own plastic surgery and a juicy helping of celebrity gossip [including] a close look at Marilyn Monroe's surgical tweaks and tucks [and] tibits [about] Sarah Bernhardt ... Fanny Brice ... Fred Astaire ... John Wayne ... Princess Grace of Monaco ... and the brave pioneers who underwent 15th-century rhinoplasties."

To read more reviews of "LIFT," written by readers, please visit Amazon.com


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